About

Tim is president and co-founder of Axero Solutions, a leading intranet software vendor. He's also a bestselling author of Who the Hell Wants to Work for You? Mastering Employee Engagement. Tim’s been featured in Fortune, Forbes, TIME, Inc Magazine, Entrepreneur, CNBC, Today, and other leading publications.

Axero
President & Co-founder
San Diego, California United States
Business forums are swimming in advice on how to change corporate culture. It’s easy to get the impression that a winning culture is a matter of top execs getting together with HR and hammering out a few values. Next, they hand off the values to Corpor...
The hospitality industry—hotels, restaurants, cruise ships, casinos—is one of the toughest places to train a customer-service professional. If you can make it there, you can make it anywhere. So, how do the best hotel chains train their employees?
To grow, a business needs satisfied customers. Lots of them. If your product works, pleasing customers isn’t rocket science. All it takes is friendly and competent service with a little extra effort. What’s so hard about that? And why do so many compan...
Most sales managers I’ve come across understand the power of employee engagement. Unfortunately, the reverse is also true. Many are feeling the devastating effects of disengagement among their troops. How do you fix disengaged salespeople?
What do engaged companies know that others forget? And what do they do that we don’t? In the most general terms, it’s the link between engagement and sales. When engaged in the right way, your company can act as a giant people magnet. Here’s how…
There’s never been a better time for big and bold HR initiatives. And while some companies are plunging in head first, others are waiting on the sidelines. What are they waiting for? Is employee engagement good for the bottom line?
A general manager’s work is easy to appreciate. Earnings and revenues are up, good. Missed your numbers, bad. CEO/CFO: the stock is up, good. Down, bad. Corporate recruiting can be easily measured in terms of filling job reqs. But what about jobs like...
Playing office politics is an ancient and complicated art. It can be as beneficial to your career as it is for pumping your ego and promoting a positive outlook on life. And when you learn to play the game, all kind of great things can go your way...
Google is full of first-world problems. Many former employees are quick to point them out on Quora, Glassdoor, and various tech forums. But for all the sour grapes out there, Google is lucky to have these problems—and can afford to have them—but many s...
With rare exception, corporate communications aim to engage. However, you’re unlikely to succeed unless you know your employees’ “hot buttons.” But how would you know that if they don’t talk to you?
We all have "hits," the business or personal wins we brag about, put on our resumes, post on social media, and milk for acknowledgment in any way we can. We also have "misses." We file them away under "learning experiences&quot...
Can employee engagement take a load off your shoulders? Sure, it can. There are lots of ways to get people to do their part, IF you are willing to let go of yours!
How come, when we ask people for their honest opinion, sometimes we get a blank stare? The simplest reason is that they don’t know or don’t care. Before we jump to the conclusion that your silent employees are incompetent or disengaged, it would be int...
Negativity in the workplace gets a bad rap. Nobody likes a Negative Nancy and everybody loves Yelena, the Yes-Woman. But it’s important to look beneath the surface. Is the uncooperative employee playing office politics? Or is there a solid business rea...
Working together is presumably why people join a company, as opposed to striking out on their own. However, it doesn’t stop them from engaging in selfish and uncooperative behaviors once they are safely installed in their offices and cubicles.
Incompetent employees are every manager’s worst nightmare. Even one such individual can cost you your quarterly bonus. Can you imagine the pain of this being a systematic problem?
As you might suspect, I wrote a book on employee engagement. It’s called Who the Hell Wants to Work for You: Mastering Employee Engagement. Since the book came out, I’ve been talking to journalists who like to interview authors. I get the same question...
If fun at work comes from bonding with your team, seriousness comes from a sense of purpose. Which comes from bonding with another group of stakeholders—your customers.
Teams and organizations could avoid many circular and tangential conversations if everyone just shut up and listened to what everyone else had to say. But before you can help them help themselves, one thing needs to happen. Somebody needs to start list...
Knowing people is not the same as liking or trusting them—but it is a necessary first step. It’s just as important to know your coworkers as it is to know the software you use to do your job. And, while software is getting more intuitive every day, peo...
Why is it that many competent and brilliant people can’t get a job at Google? What’s special about intellectual humility and why is it hard to find? Can we learn this trait and teach it to others?
It’s a paradox: we are never so close to our dreams as when we think we’ve failed. Take it from the man who has failed as spectacularly as he has succeeded.
How do you get people to recognize your contributions, preferably on a daily basis? You don’t want to sit and wait for it, that’s for sure. But you may not want to blow your own horn either—or butter people up just to get a quid pro quo. Here’s a bette...
Getting started on something might seem like the hardest thing to do. Your brain resists it with all its might. You can’t argue with your brain; you will lose every time. But you can trick it. Here's how...
Whether they write code, save lives, or serve beer, managers always want employees to step on the gas. It’s a common problem that invites a common solution: pressure. However, if you over-rely on pressure, you may break things that are hard to fix—like...
If you are a manager, you carry a double responsibility for keeping yourself in high spirits and protecting your employees from unnecessary drudgery and fun-killing pressure. Here's why...
You want employees who love to work, not the ones who despise and avoid it. Part of the responsibility to love one’s work rests with the employee. However, there is a lot an employer can do to make the work rewarding and even addictive...
All of my friends, family, and many others have snubbed their noses at every single piece of advice I am about to give you, and you are welcome to do the same. Just know that it works...